City of Los Angeles Ends Illegal Pocket Veto

The City of Los Angeles has finally dispensed with a longstanding illegal policy and practice that gave individual City Councilmembers unbridled power to decide if, whether, and where supportive and affordable housing projects are built in the City. As a consequence, the Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment (ACCE Action) is dismissing its lawsuit challenging this illegal pocket veto.

For years, advocates have complained that the City’s use of Letters of Acknowledgement and Support violates fair housing laws and impedes housing projects that our community desperately needs. The use of such local approval requirements are also a nationally recognized impediment to fair housing. But prior to filing our lawsuit, the City ignored all demands to stop its illegal policy and practice.

As a direct result of this litigation, the City has completely and permanently eliminated all such letter requirements. The City’s actions go well beyond the requirements of last year’s state Assembly Bill 829, which prohibits state assistance for housing developments that are subject to such letter requirements. The City has removed the letter requirements from all of its affordable and low income housing loan programs that use state as well as local funding, including the Affordable Housing Managed Pipeline and the Proposition HHH programs. As a result, individual City Councilmembers can no longer utilize a pocket veto to unilaterally block, delay or condition housing projects for any or no reason at all. Nor can they use this practice to insert additional discriminatory barriers to projects, such as requiring the support of neighborhood councils.

We are pleased to have largely achieved the goals of our lawsuit. It’s unfortunate that it took so many years for the City to do the right thing, but we are satisfied that the City has made progress. We will continue to monitor the City’s actions, and take appropriate steps as necessary, to ensure that it does not erect additional arbitrary barriers to affordable and supportive housing.

ACCE Action is represented by PILP, Public Counsel, and Rosen Bien Galvan and Grunfeld LLP.

Read More Here.

Staff : January 18, 2019 4:25 pm : News and Updates
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Judge Orders the City of Encinitas to Adopt a Housing Element; City’s first since 1992

On December 12, 2018, Judge Frazier of the San Diego Superior Court ordered the City of Encinitas to adopt its first housing element since 1992 without subjecting the necessary zoning changes to density and height limitations to the voters for approval.

San Diego voters approved Proposition A in 2013, requiring all height and density increases to be approved by a majority of voters, even when density and height changes are required to comply with state housing element law and to provide adequate sites to accommodate the City’s fair share of the region’s housing projections.

On behalf of Lorraine Del-Rose and the organization, San Diego Tenants United, PILP, San Diego Voluntary Lawyer’s Program, and Cozen O’Connor sued the City of Encinitas after the voters rejected the City’s housing element. Several weeks after our lawsuit was filed, the Building Industry Association filed an almost identical suit that was related and assigned to the same judge.

The Court ordered the City to adopt a housing element with the necessary zoning changes within 120 days and without subjecting the plan to the voters. This marks the first time the City will identify adequate sites for lower-income households in three decades.

To view the Judge’s order, click HERE.

Terrell Kingwood : January 9, 2019 2:40 pm : News and Updates
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Onwards

Public interest legal services lost a great warrior, leader, and mentor this week. Stephen Ronfeldt, a co-founder of PILP, Director of Litigation of the Legal Aid Society of Alameda County, member of the inaugural class of the Reginald Heber Smith fellows and the 2018 recipient of the Loren Miller Legal Services Award, passed away peacefully on December 1 at home with his loving family around him.
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Staff : December 10, 2018 10:38 am : Brilliant and Compassionate, Spotlight
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San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors to Implement State Mandate

Read the Press Release Here. more »

Terrell Kingwood : November 29, 2018 3:24 pm : News and Updates
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Community Group Sues City of Los Angeles for Using Illegal Procedure to Block Supportive and Affordable Housing Projects for Homeless

Update!

Recent Press:
Los Angeles Times
To keep state funding, L.A. eliminates “veto” provision

Read the Complaint Here.
Read the Press Release Here.
Read Los Angeles Times Editorial Here.

LOS ANGELES, July 26, 2018 — Public Counsel, Rosen Bien Galvan and Grunfeld LLP, and the Public Interest Law Project announced today that they have filed suit on behalf of Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment (ACCE Action) against the City of Los Angeles over an illegal city procedure deceptively labeled the Letter of Acknowledgment (LOA), which gives individual City Councilmembers the power to decide if, whether and where supportive and affordable housing projects are built in the City. LOAs currently allow individual Councilmembers to secretly block, alter or delay affordable and supportive housing projects for any reason or no reason at all, violating multiple provisions of state law. Without obtaining a LOA from a Councilmember, developers cannot be eligible for supportive and affordable housing funding from the City. The Complaint alleges that LOAs are an illegal barrier that stand in the way of the housing solutions that would solve the City’s continuing problems of homelessness and segregation — despite the voters’ clear intent to the contrary.

The overwhelming success of Proposition HHH in 2016 authorized $1.2 billion to fund the construction of 10,000 units of supportive and affordable housing throughout LA. However, almost two years after its historic passage there are still districts in LA where there are no Proposition HHH housing units. “This is a crisis of conscience. Voters have said loud and clear that the City must do everything in its power to fund supportive and affordable housing and help get our neighbors off the street,” said Mark Rosenbaum, Director of Public Counsel’s Opportunity Under Law Project. “Yet the City continues to maintain a policy that thwarts the will of the people by allowing Councilmembers to covertly veto the building of supportive and affordable housing in their districts, in order to placate NIMBYs and interest groups who want to keep homeless residents and low-income people out of their neighborhoods.”

“No other type of development in the City is subject to the same arbitrary approval by an individual Councilmember, which is a violation of state law”
– Michael Rawson, Director of the Public Interest Law Project

“The LOA policy is a clear violation of California state laws, including laws prohibiting discrimination in housing based on race or disability and laws protecting supportive and affordable housing,” said Jeffrey Bornstein, a Partner at Rosen Bien Galvan and Grunfeld LLP. “No other type of development in the City is subject to the same arbitrary approval by an individual Councilmember, which is a violation of state law,” said Michael Rawson, Director of the Public Interest Law Project. “This is a known impediment to fair housing that has been nationally criticized for years, yet the City keeps readopting it year after year,” said Shashi Hanuman, Directing Attorney of Public Counsel’s Community Development Project.

In addition to the lack of accountability, the adverse effects of the LOA policy are felt most acutely by people of color and people with disabilities, who are disproportionately homeless. The most recent homeless count in LA showed that on any given night, over 31,000 individuals, including children, seniors, veterans, individuals with mental and physical disabilities, and survivors of domestic violence, have no choice but to live in sidewalk encampments and sleep in tents or sleeping bags. “Every day that our elected officials delay or outright reject supportive and affordable housing projects means another night on the streets for residents in desperate need of a place to call home,” said Gloria Cortez, of ACCE, the plaintiff in the case. “It’s time for the City to remove this unnecessary barrier to building the housing we need to solve our homelessness crisis and put roofs over our fellow Angelenos’ heads.”

The plaintiff is represented by Public Counsel, Rosen Bien Galvan and Grunfeld LLP, and the Public Interest Law Project.

More Press:
Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Daily News

Staff : July 31, 2018 11:02 am : News and Updates
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Uplift Inglewood Coalition Sues City Over New L.A. Clippers Arena

INGLEWOOD, CA, June 19, 2018 – Uplift Inglewood Coalition, an affiliation of community empowerment organizations, today filed a lawsuit against the City of Inglewood, charging that the City violated state housing and civil rights laws by entering into an Exclusive Negotiation Agreement (ENA) with the L.A. Clippers for use of public land to build a NBA basketball arena. The suit seeks to vindicate the rights of Inglewood residents during a time of rapid community change and skyrocketing housing costs that have already displaced many long-term residents.

“At a time when low-income Inglewood residents are facing a devastating and growing housing crisis, we allege that the City of Inglewood has failed to comply with multiple state laws that are intended to produce much-needed affordable housing,” said Antonio Hicks, a senior staff attorney with Public Counsel. “As documented in this lawsuit, by entering into an ENA with the Clippers, the City violated California’s Surplus Land Act, which mandates that surplus public land is first offered for sale or lease for the purpose of affordable housing.”

California’s Surplus Land Act is a longstanding state law designed to promote the development of affordable housing, and requires that government agencies prioritize the use of publicly owned land for affordable housing – or for parks and recreational purposes – before the land is offered to developers for other purposes. The suit further alleges that the City’s failure to comply with the Surplus Land Act results in civil rights violations – by discriminating against the development of housing intended for low-income households, and disproportionally against members of certain racial and ethnic groups and individuals with disabilities.

The City of Inglewood and Clippers owner, Steve Ballmer, recently held a press conference to announce proposed state legislation to provide shortcuts for the stadium project by exempting it from certain environmental challenges. At the press conference, Ballmer made the following remarks: “I want to build a house in Inglewood … We’d like to have our own house, right here, on this site.”

“The City of Inglewood is choosing to use publicly owned land to help a billionaire build a home for his sports team, at a time when longtime residents are struggling to stay in their own homes,” said Woodrow Curry, III, a member of the Uplift Inglewood Coalition. “It’s morally bankrupt and a mismanagement of our public resources. We’re calling on the city’s leadership to do the right thing and to prioritize the creation of affordable homes before arenas.”

Inglewood’s own analysis indicates that over eighty (80) percent of Inglewood residents qualify for some sort of subsidized housing. And the City’s data shows that rents in the City of Inglewood have risen by almost twenty-five (25) percent in the last five years alone, and almost fifty (50) percent of Inglewood residents are low-income and severely rent-burdened, which means they are paying more than fifty (50) percent of their income towards housing.

Many Inglewood residents point to the construction of a $4 billion NFL stadium – slated as the future home of the L.A. Rams and L.A. Chargers – as a catalyst for driving up housing costs and turning Inglewood into a hot area for property speculation. Stories abound of landlords that are looking to cash-in, and with no rent-control protections in place, long-time residents of Inglewood claim they are being driven out of their homes.

“I’m an Inglewood renter, and now I’m on the verge of losing my home,” said Sara Santos, a resident who supports the lawsuit. “My landlord just raised my rent by $300, and it breaks my heart that I may have to leave my community. For so many years, Inglewood was an affordable place to call home. But now it seems like city leaders have been seduced by outside billionaires, and have forgotten about the everyday folks who are the true champions of Inglewood.”

The suit also alleges violation of additional California law that requires cities to take steps to plan and zone for adequate affordable housing and shelter for homeless residents – as well as the charges that Inglewood has failed to develop 112 affordable housing replacement units it was obligated to produce several years ago.

“When cities ignore laws like the Surplus Land Act, it creates a ripple effect throughout the region, resulting in less affordable housing units and ultimately more homelessness,” said Tom Casparian, an attorney with Cozen O’Connor. “All this lawsuit seeks to do is get the City of Inglewood to follow the law.”

Public Counsel, the Public Interest Law Project (PILP), and the law firm of Cozen O’Connor filed an action in Los Angeles Superior Court today asking the Court to order Inglewood to follow the requirements of the Surplus Land Act and meet its obligations to adequately plan and zone for affordable housing and shelter in the city – as required of every city in the State.

More Resources:
Complaint
Press Release
Frequently Asked Questions

Press:
LA Curbed
LAist
The Daily Breeze
LA Daily News
ESPN

 

 

 

Staff : June 21, 2018 4:10 pm : News and Updates
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Welcome Terrell!

PILP is pleased to announce and welcome Terrell Kingwood as our first Director of Operations. Terrell will be responsible for the leadership of PILP’s human resources, administrative operations, finances, grant management, and development.
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Staff : May 2, 2018 4:31 pm : Spotlight, Staff Announcements
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Protecting Affordable Housing in Shasta County

In 2011, Shasta County was several years late adopting its required housing element revision. Because of its tardy timeline, the County committed itself to rezoning sites to accommodate 800 units of higher density housing that could meet the unincorporated County’s housing need for lower income households. But by the next state required revision in 2014, the County had not completed the rezonings and again, did not adopt a timely update to the Housing Element of its General Plan.

Because of this ongoing failure to plan for the housing needs of lower income families and individuals, Tracy Bowman and Micheal Williamson, who have both struggled to find and maintain affordable housing in Shasta County, with the help of Legal Services of Northern California and PILP, filed a lawsuit to challenge the County’s lack of an adequate housing element and compel the rezoning to accommodate the 800 affordable units from the last planning period and over 300 units needed during the current planning period. In addition to the required rezonings, the County must also establish a zone, or zones, where emergency shelters can be built without a Conditional Use Permit. Despite the 10 year old legal requirement to do so, the County still does not allow the construction of emergency shelters anywhere in the County without discretionary review.

Learn More Here from the Record Searchlight and Here from KRCR News.

Staff : February 27, 2018 1:44 pm : News and Updates
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Rural General Assistance Project (Rural GAP) Turns Five

Five years ago, the Public Interest Law Project (PILP) began a special project to increase access to General Assistance (GA) benefits in rural areas.  This program, also sometimes called General Relief (GR), provides critical aid to California’s lowest income individuals.

In rural counties throughout California, eligible people cannot easily access last resort GA benefits.  Many counties with high numbers of people living in poverty have fewer than 40 people receiving GA.  Some have zero, or fewer than 10.  Counties impose unlawful and often unwritten eligibility requirements and adopt improperly low grant levels.  Through its Rural General Assistance Project (Rural GAP), PILP seeks to increase access to these critical benefits and assist local advocates in enforcing counties’ legal duty to provide GA to all needy residents.

In the past four years, PILP’s General Assistance advocacy has brought approximately $52,413,392 in additional benefits to thousands of recipients throughout the State.  We could not have done it without the support and hard work of our many legal services partners.

Here are a few Rural GAP highlights:

  • GA Summit: On September 22, 2014, PILP, the Coalition of California Welfare Rights Organizations (CCWRO), California Rural Legal Assistance, Inc. (CRLA), Legal Services of Northern California (LSNC), and Western Center on Law & Poverty (WCLP) hosted a statewide advocate summit to strategize about how to increase GA access in rural areas.  17 organizations sent advocates to the summit.
  • The project was featured by the Shriver Center in May 2015.
  • PILP and WCLP worked to eliminate the $40 medical deduction statewide, after most recipients became eligible for Medi-Cal under the Affordable Care Act, eliminating this expense for thousands of people living in poverty.
  • PILP and CRLA achieved systemic reform in San Benito, Monterey, and Yuba counties
  • Technical Assistance: PILP has provided technical assistance to advocates in 46 counties

The Work Continues:

Many counties are still not serving their neediest residents, and we must continue to work to bring them into compliance with the law and improve their policies.  Some counties improperly withhold housing aid, others do not provide the required statutory minimum grant.  Please let PILP know how we can better provide support to you, either through training, technical assistance, or collaboration to achieve systemic reform.

PILP is a statewide support center that provides crucial litigation and advocacy support to local legal services and public interest law programs throughout California.  Our work brings affordable housing to lower income families and homeless people, provides access to services and public benefits for lower income persons and persons with disabilities, and protects neglected and abused children and persons displaced by major disasters and government action.

Staff : October 24, 2017 11:50 am : Advocacy, News and Updates
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Low Income Residents Compel Monterey County to Follow State Law

Monterey, CA – The Monterey County Board of Supervisors adopted a resolution approving new aid payment standards for their General Assistance (GA) Program. The new aid payment standards are the result of a lawsuit filed in Superior Court on behalf of a low-income resident represented by California Rural Legal Assistance, Inc. (CRLA) and PILP. The County also adopted a new appeal process that ensures that applicants and recipients can appeal a negative County decision.

General Assistance (GA) is a program of last resort mandated by state law and administered by counties. It requires counties to provide approximately $340 dollars per month to severely impoverished, lawful residents with no other options. GA recipients are often homeless, unemployed, or unemployable. Many recipients have disabilities, are veterans, and a significant number are survivors of domestic violence. GA allows these individuals to find modest shelter, like a shared room, and to acquire other essentials such as hygiene products and transportation.

Monterey County’s GA program failed to issue adequate grants, making it even harder for many vulnerable recipients to overcome homelessness. In particular, the County’s maximum GA grant was almost $40 dollars lower than the amount required by the state. Recipients were also being denied the housing portion of their grant, leaving them to subsist on around $133 a month or around $4.43 per day. Recipients also reported being denied a big portion of aid, through no fault of their own, for reasons such as a landlord not returning housing cost verifications. Lastly, recipients were deprived of due process rights when they were given notices with little explanation as to why they were being denied aid and what they could do about it.

“This settlement provides opportunity for indigent and homeless people to live more decently and could possibly change their life. The increase can mean new clothes, a night or two of housing, and perhaps a chance to move from the streets to a shared living situation. For others, the increase means they will have money for transportation to seek housing or work. We’re hopeful this money will make positive difference in many peoples’ lives.” stated Phyllis Katz, Directing Attorney, CRLA Salinas.

“We appreciate the openness of County employees and their willingness to enact the necessary changes. The County’s resolution addresses our concerns, and brings the County’s GA program within the State’s legal requirements,” said Lauren Hansen, PILP.

Staff : September 21, 2017 1:57 pm : News and Updates
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